Interleaving is a roll of the dice (and that's a good thing!)

Interleaving is a roll of the dice (and that's a good thing!)

How can we use interleaving without planning? Last week, we wrote about interleaving (and fruit salad). The key to effective interleaving is to mix up similar topics, which encourages students to discriminate between similar ideas, concepts, and problems. This week, learn about quick and fun strategies for interleaving in the classroom that put students in charge – more learning for them, less planning for us.

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What do fruit salad and interleaving have in common?

What do fruit salad and interleaving have in common?

Interleaving is a powerful strategy that boosts learning by mixing up content students need to learn. Based on a wealth of cognitive science research, the challenge and "desirable difficulty" of interleaving can double exam performance compared to teaching content in "blocks" of the same concepts. But what's the secret to effective and fruitful interleaving? Mix similar topics. Read more about why and stay tuned for next week, when we'll share quick how to's.

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Tomayto, tomahto, potayto, retrieval?

Tomayto, tomahto, potayto, retrieval?

What's in a name? When we talk about retrieval practice, we describe it as "bringing information to mind" or "getting information out." No matter what we call it, learning by any other name would be just as powerful! This week, we present a variety of ways to describe and define "retrieval." Learn more from Doug Lemov, collaborator, expert educator, and author of Teach Like a Champion 2.0. Join hundreds of educators and add your definition, too!

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Wait a minute. How do cognitive scientists teach?

Wait a minute. How do cognitive scientists teach?

We talk the talk. But can we walk the walk? As cognitive scientists, we love talking about our research. Particularly when it comes to learning, which is so integral to everything we do everyday. Cognitive science research is great. But how do researchers teach? This week, read articles from three cognitive scientists about how they teach using retrieval practice, spacing, and metacognition in their own classrooms.

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Does time spent teaching mean time spent learning?

Does time spent teaching mean time spent learning?

Need more hours in the day? Time is limited and learning is vast. How can we implement retrieval practice in our classrooms, but cover all our course content, too? It doesn't have to be one or the other. We provide research and recommendations on how retrieval practice doesn't require more time to transform learning. Small adjustments can make a big difference.

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Where can you learn more? The library, of course!

Where can you learn more? The library, of course!

Have you seen our library? Check it out! There are so many websites, articles, and books about cognitive science to explore, but it can also seem like cognitive science research is hidden under a giant rock. We want to change that. Spend 5 minutes and discover our library of resources and downloads. Always open, no reservations needed, never booked. (Not a fan of our library puns? We can only blame our shelves.)
 

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How can we reduce student anxiety?

How can we reduce student anxiety?

Retrieval is great. But how do I get my students on board? We know that retrieval practice is a learning strategy, not an assessment strategy, but our students may feel otherwise. How can we "package" retrieval practice for our students? How can we flip retrieval practice from a negative to a positive? This week, we share research and our recommendations on reducing students' anxiety.

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Push Beyond "One and Done"

Push Beyond "One and Done"

So far, we've focused on retrieval practice – improving learning by bringing information to mind. But when and how often? Is more retrieval practice better than less? This week, we feature research on successive relearning. In a nutshell, successful relearning is a combination of engaging in retrieval practice multiple times, while also spacing those retrievals out over time.

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